Jessica Sepel of JSHealth Vitamins: These are the FIVE Foods I Eat for Immunity in Winter

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Nutritionist Jessica Sepel eats garlic, turmeric, green vegetables, eggs and extra virgin olive oil daily to keep her immune system in top shape during the winter months.

The Australian wellness professional, who is behind the JSHealth Vitamins worsens, consuming a “nutrient dense” diet during cold and flu season while satisfying her craving for “warming and nourishing foods” that fill her up.

“These are my favorite winter superfoods that I’m aware of using during the colder months. They are so easy to incorporate into your everyday cooking,” she wrote on her Blog.

“I was really blown away when I started to understand on a deeper level how the food we eat impacts a whole host of bodily functions.”

Nutritionist Jessica Sepel eats garlic, turmeric, green vegetables, eggs and extra virgin olive oil daily to keep her immune system in top shape during the winter months

GARLIC

Garlic is a natural antibiotic due to its antimicrobial properties.

Garlic also supports a healthy cardiovascular system, lowers blood pressure and promotes healthy cell regeneration thanks to its high sulfur content.

The latter, according to health specialistswas found to “significantly reduce levels of a protein called myeloperoxidase which could lead to bone loss or cardiovascular disease.”

“I love adding it to salad dressings, soups, stir-fries and vegetable roasts,” Jessica said.

“If you don’t have a garlic grinder, I highly recommend buying one, they make it easy to prepare fresh garlic.”

Recipe: How to Make Jessica Sepel’s Healthy Fried Rice with Kale, Garlic, and Chili

Ingredients

1 cup brown rice, uncooked

1/2 onion, chopped

2 garlic cloves, crushed

3 cups kale, finely chopped

2 tablespoons of tamari

2 tablespoons sesame/coconut oil

1-2 organic free-range eggs (optional)

Chilli flakes (optional)

Sesame seeds and chopped spring onion, to garnish

Method

1. Cook brown rice as directed, set aside.

2. Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium-low heat. Add the onions, stirring until soft and translucent (4-5 minutes). Add the garlic and sauté another 2-3 minutes. Add kale and stir until softened.

3. Add the rice and cook another two minutes, stirring.

4. At this point you may choose to add 1-2 organic eggs. If so, crack two eggs into a separate bowl and whisk lightly. Then add to the hot pot with the rice, stirring the egg into the mixture until fully cooked.

5. Add the tamari and cook for another minute. Divide between two bowls, garnish with sesame seeds, spring onions and chili flakes and serve.

For 2

TURMERIC

Turmeric is a spice that not only adds a great flavor to foods, but also has anti-inflammatory properties.

According CHOICEthe curcumin in turmeric has also been used in traditional Indian (Ayurvedic) and Chinese medicine to treat a range of conditions affecting the blood, liver, joints, immune system and digestive tract.

Research has also found that turmeric and curcumin significantly reduce LDL and blood triglycerides, which may protect patients at risk for cardiovascular disease.

“I love adding a teaspoon to soups, stir-fries, scrambled eggs, turmeric lattes, and cauliflower rice,” Jessica says.

“I love adding a teaspoon to soups, stir-fries, scrambled eggs, turmeric lattes, and cauliflower rice,” Jessica says.

GREEN VEGETABLES

Rich green foods are packed with nutrients and antioxidants that can support the immune system through winter, including chlorophyll, magnesium, iron, calcium, and folic acid.

“Broccoli and kale are two examples of green vegetables rich in vitamin C. Vitamin C is essential for supporting immune function,” Jessica says.

“Our bodies cannot make their own vitamin C, so it’s important that we get it through our diet.”

Recipe: How to make Jessica Sepel’s Creamy Broccoli Pasta

Ingredients

2 x organic broccoli heads, cut into florets

1/4 cup milk of choice

3 tablespoons of olive oil

3 tablespoons lukewarm water

1 tablespoon parmesan shavings (optional)

salt, to taste,

black pepper, to taste

chili flakes, to taste

1 package mung bean or brown rice pasta

chopped basil, to taste

Method

1. Steam or boil the broccoli heads until tender. Cut them into bouquets.

2. While broccoli steams, cook pasta according to package directions.

3. When the broccoli is cooked, place the broccoli in a food processor. Add the milk, olive oil, salt, pepper, chilli and parmesan (if using). Blitz until you have achieved pure creaminess.

4. Once the pasta is cooked, drain it and return it to the pan. Add broccoli sauce and toss until pasta is well coated.

5. To serve, divide pasta into bowls and top with additional Parmesan and chopped basil.

For 2

EGGS

Eggs are rich in protein, B vitamins and essential fatty acids which, in addition to supporting immune function, help keep us energized during the colder months.

An average serving of two eggs contains 82% of your daily vitamin D needs, 50% of your daily folate needs, 25% of your daily riboflavin (vitamin B2) needs, and 40% of your daily selenium needs.

They also contain vitamins A, E, B5, B12, as well as iron, iodine and phosphorus which are essential to support a balanced diet.

Eggs are rich in protein, B vitamins and essential fatty acids which, in addition to supporting immune function, help keep us energized during the colder months.  You can find Jessica's green brekky bowl recipe here

Eggs are rich in protein, B vitamins and essential fatty acids which, in addition to supporting immune function, help keep us energized during the colder months. You can find Jessica’s tripe-loving green brekky bowl recipe here

EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL

“A real superfood,” Jessica says, adding that olive oil is rich in nourishing fatty acids and antioxidants that can help reduce inflammation.

“When picking olive oil, opt for extra virgin olive oil whenever possible, as this means no heat has been added during processing,” he said. she stated.

“Extra virgin olive oil is my cooking oil of choice, it’s perfect for roasting vegetables and is delicious drizzled directly on salads.”

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